"An actor should be a mystery," says Christopher Plummer. But these days actors must do publicity, he laments — so the popular film and stage actor has agreed to answer numerous questions in a surprisingly candid, honest manner in this 1967 CBC-TV interview. He opens up about his reluctance to star in The Sound of Music, gives his opinion on why actors tend to drink heavily, criticizes Hollywood’s “star system,” and explains why he chose acting over a music career.  

via: plummerchristopher

Tampons were packed with their strings connecting them, like a strip of sausages, so they wouldn’t float away. Engineers asked Ride, “Is 100 the right number?” She would be in space for a week. “That would not be the right number,” she told them. At every turn, her difference was made clear to her. When it was announced Ride had been named to a space flight mission, her shuttle commander, Bob Crippen, who became a lifelong friend and colleague, introduced her as “undoubtedly the prettiest member of the crew.” At another press event, a reporter asked Ride how she would react to a problem on the shuttle: “Do you weep?”

People silently struggle from all kinds of terrible things. They suffer from depression, ambition, substance abuse, and pretension. They suffer from family tragedy, Ivy-League educations, and self-loathing. They suffer from failing marriages, physical pain, and publishing. The good thing about politeness is that you can treat these people exactly the same. And then wait to see what happens. You don’t have to have an opinion. You don’t need to make a judgment. I know that doesn’t sound like liberation, because we live and work in an opinion-based economy. But it is. Not having an opinion means not having an obligation. And not being obligated is one of the sweetest of life’s riches.

There seems to be an edge ahead, barely visible but suggesting a sharp drop. Then the light begins to shift, from an all-encompassing white to intense reds and blues. Now you feel as if you were deep within a Rothko, bathed in nonspecific spirituality. It would be nice to have a wall to lean against, but you can’t make one out. It’s important to remain upright, you tell yourself. You still have five or six minutes to go.

just got around to reading this article, so here you go:

Panza Villa Exhibits Illusionary Works - NYTimes.com

Robert Motherwell - The Open series

"The Open series preoccupied Motherwell from 1967 until the last years of his life. 

Open was a personal response to the colorfield paintings made by younger abstract painters in the ’60s.

Motherwell’s abstracts are his equivalents to the views through open windows favored by European painters such as Matisse as metaphors for the relationship between the interior world of the emotions and the external world of the senses.”

via: conversationswiththelight

glad to see these making the rounds again. i have the flash cards for “abstract” and “perspective” printed out and posted by my desk. always a reblog.
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A scan of both sides of a flash card illustrating how to say “museum” in sign language. This 1979 card set, which was scavenged from a dumpster at the Art Institute of Chicago about ten years ago, features an enjoyable collection of rudimentary drawings that attempt to convey the most basic essentials of the museum and the field of art, in addition to providing a lesson in signing. Click here to download a PDF of the entire set.
via: (the always wonderful) publiccollectors & thisbelongsinamuseum

glad to see these making the rounds again. i have the flash cards for “abstract” and “perspective” printed out and posted by my desk. always a reblog.

——

A scan of both sides of a flash card illustrating how to say “museum” in sign language. This 1979 card set, which was scavenged from a dumpster at the Art Institute of Chicago about ten years ago, features an enjoyable collection of rudimentary drawings that attempt to convey the most basic essentials of the museum and the field of art, in addition to providing a lesson in signing. Click here to download a PDF of the entire set.

via: (the always wonderful) publiccollectors & thisbelongsinamuseum

I really enjoy forgetting. When I first come to a place, I notice all the little details. I notice the way the sky looks, the color of white paper, the way people walk, doorknobs, everything. Then I get used to the place, and I don’t notice those things anymore. So only by forgetting can I see the place again, as it really is.