hi all:

a little project i’ve been working on for the past month (with the help of friends and family) is rolling out today. it’s a bit of mail art inspired by the work of on kawara: it involves postcards, writing, mindfulness, and photography.

starting today, entries will be posted for the next month or so. it’s beautiful to see what people wrote and saw. to be with them in that moment, just for a moment. 

here’s the first entry. 

——

thingsarethesamebutdifferent project:

sent september 5, 2014
response received september 16, 2014

sender

i got off the bus this morning and discovered that instead of going along the shoulder of the highway, there is a path that cuts through the forest. i am on that path now for the first time. being here makes my tiny, very solitary commute even more remote. i am in the woods but i can hear traffic. it smells of pine straw and humidity. it’s a legitimate path made by the state park, not a desire path made by people like me. this place is so intentional, yet kind of hidden too. until now.

recipient

rain grey eight floor not blinded by the blinds
looking out who’s looking in too far up too
far down or far enough to care
day time night time dusk is both but neither
alone here but not out there soon to join
them so we can be alone together
constant stream fed by a thoughtless rain

There seems to be an edge ahead, barely visible but suggesting a sharp drop. Then the light begins to shift, from an all-encompassing white to intense reds and blues. Now you feel as if you were deep within a Rothko, bathed in nonspecific spirituality. It would be nice to have a wall to lean against, but you can’t make one out. It’s important to remain upright, you tell yourself. You still have five or six minutes to go.

just got around to reading this article, so here you go:

Panza Villa Exhibits Illusionary Works - NYTimes.com

glad to see these making the rounds again. i have the flash cards for “abstract” and “perspective” printed out and posted by my desk. always a reblog.
——
A scan of both sides of a flash card illustrating how to say “museum” in sign language. This 1979 card set, which was scavenged from a dumpster at the Art Institute of Chicago about ten years ago, features an enjoyable collection of rudimentary drawings that attempt to convey the most basic essentials of the museum and the field of art, in addition to providing a lesson in signing. Click here to download a PDF of the entire set.
via: (the always wonderful) publiccollectors & thisbelongsinamuseum

glad to see these making the rounds again. i have the flash cards for “abstract” and “perspective” printed out and posted by my desk. always a reblog.

——

A scan of both sides of a flash card illustrating how to say “museum” in sign language. This 1979 card set, which was scavenged from a dumpster at the Art Institute of Chicago about ten years ago, features an enjoyable collection of rudimentary drawings that attempt to convey the most basic essentials of the museum and the field of art, in addition to providing a lesson in signing. Click here to download a PDF of the entire set.

via: (the always wonderful) publiccollectors & thisbelongsinamuseum

Christopher Payne (USA) - Textiles (2010-2014)

Christopher Payne specializes in the documentation of America’s vanishing architecture and industrial landscape. Trained as an architect, he is fascinated by how things are purposefully designed and constructed, and how they work. His first book, New York’s Forgotten Substations: The Power Behind the Subway, offered dramatic, rare views of the behemoth machines that are hidden behind modest facades in New York City. His second book, Asylum: Inside the Closed World of State Mental Hospitals, which includes an essay by the renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks, was the result of a seven-year survey of America’s vast and largely shuttered state mental institutions. Payne’s forthcoming book, North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City, explores an uninhabited island of ruins in the East River. Payne’s photographs invoke the former grandeur of the site over different seasons, capturing hints of buried streets and infrastructure now reclaimed by nature, while also offering a unique glimpse into a city’s future without people.

Payne’s recent work, including a series in progress on the American textile industry, has veered away from the documentation of the obsolete towards a celebration of craftsmanship and small-scale manufacturing that are persevering in the face of global competition and evolutions in industrial processes. Nearing completion is One Steinway Place, a tour through the famous Steinway & Sons piano factory in Astoria, Queens. Here a team of skilled workers creates exquisite instruments considered to be some of the finest in the world. Payne captures moments of the choreographies of production and assembly, and inspects the parts and pieces of the instruments that will never be visible outside of the factory, telling a story of intricacy, precision, and care he fears is becoming all too rare in the American workplace.

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Christopher Payne | artist found at photojojo]

via: artchipel


This is a piece by Ed Ruscha recently installed beside the High Line park in New York – the first Ruscha painting, I am told, installed as a mural outside. So much of Ruscha’s work has always seemed to draw subjects and visuals from the streets around him, so it’s great to see that imagery reinserted into its native habitat. It’s almost possible to imagine a new Ruscha that appropriates parts of this mural, as a (very) assisted readymade.

via: blakegopnik

This is a piece by Ed Ruscha recently installed beside the High Line park in New York – the first Ruscha painting, I am told, installed as a mural outside. So much of Ruscha’s work has always seemed to draw subjects and visuals from the streets around him, so it’s great to see that imagery reinserted into its native habitat. It’s almost possible to imagine a new Ruscha that appropriates parts of this mural, as a (very) assisted readymade.

via: blakegopnik

The married artist duo Christo and Jeanne-Claude were born on the same day, 79 years ago: June 13, 1935.Renowned for their international site-specific artworks, the couple is seen here in our Great Stair Hall, which is wrapped—in their signature fashion—in conjunction with the first Earth Day, in 1970.

Wrapped Stairway, Floor and Walls, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania,PA. (Photo: Harry Shunk © 1970 Christo)

via: philamuseum