The building at 101 Spring Street is one of a few artist homes preserved in New York. As such, it offers a rare glimpse into an artist’s daily process. Judd purchased the building in 1968 after a successful exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. He needed more space than his studio on East 18th street provided, and the cast iron—with its five floors, its open spaces, and its big, wide windows—offered room and light often unavailable in New York. (A few years later, this too would seem confining, and Judd would begin spending part of the year in Marfa, Texas, chosen because of the emptiness surrounding it.) Judd renovated the building along with his then wife, Julie Finch. He smoothed floors and walls, purchased and commissioned art from his friends, and constructed his own furniture. He decided how the building should be used, assigning each floor a specific task: meeting, eating, working, socializing, sleeping. His mark on the space is omnipresent.

hydeordie:

In 1970 he gathered up almost all the art he had made between graduation from art school in 1953 and the start of the word paintings in 1966 and took it to a mortuary crematorium. Everything was incinerated. Some ashes were interred in a book-shaped bronze urn, and a paid death-notice was published in the paper. RIP, John Baldessari, painter.

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via: eloisemoorehead

Not mentioned below in original post, my favorite part of this project is how he baked some of the ashes into cookies and served them.

image

John Baldessari, Cremation Project, Corpus Wafers (With Text, Recipe and Documentation), 1970, Jar of cookies; original affidavit of publication; recipe for making cookies; public newspaper announcement containing a notice of cremation of his early works done between May 1953 and March 1966; set of 6 photographs of the cremation event, dimensions variable, Gift of The Glenstone Foundation, Mitchell P. Rales, Founder, in honor of Ned Rifkin’s tenure as Director of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (2002-2005), 2005, Accession Number: 05.26. [source]
“PRINTS: FLAVIN, JUDD, SANDBACK” Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Fred SandbackDavid Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYCan exhibition of prints by Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, and Fred Sandback. While predominantly known for their three dimensional works, drawing and printmaking were valued techniques that each of these artists engaged with throughout their careers. The mechanical and collaborative components inherent to the process of printmaking had clear correlations to their shared Minimal aesthetic, and it proved to be an additional medium for these artists to express their understanding of space and material. Executed between 1961 and 1994, the selection of prints on view will offer additional insight into each of artist’s unique sculptural practices, attitudes, and concerns.  
opens Jan 14up thru Mar 1
via: nycartscene

PRINTS: FLAVIN, JUDD, SANDBACK
 Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Fred Sandback

David Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYC

an exhibition of prints by Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, and Fred Sandback. While predominantly known for their three dimensional works, drawing and printmaking were valued techniques that each of these artists engaged with throughout their careers. The mechanical and collaborative components inherent to the process of printmaking had clear correlations to their shared Minimal aesthetic, and it proved to be an additional medium for these artists to express their understanding of space and material. Executed between 1961 and 1994, the selection of prints on view will offer additional insight into each of artist’s unique sculptural practices, attitudes, and concerns.  

opens Jan 14
up thru Mar 1

via: nycartscene