Ruth Asawa and her work (1926 - 2013)

Whether it’s a craft or whether it’s art. That is a definition that people put on things. And what I like is the material is irrelevant. It’s just that that happens to be material that I use. And I think that is important. That you take an ordinary material like wire and you make it, you give it a new definition. That’s all.

—excerpt from oral history interview with Ruth Asawa and Albert Lanier, 2002 June 21-July 5, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
image via: jesuisperdu
Ruth Asawa and her work (1926 - 2013)
Whether it’s a craft or whether it’s art. That is a definition that people put on things. And what I like is the material is irrelevant. It’s just that that happens to be material that I use. And I think that is important. That you take an ordinary material like wire and you make it, you give it a new definition. That’s all.

image via: jesuisperdu

Ask any archivist — or most anyone for that matter — what the importance of historical materials held by archives is and they will likely tell you that it is so large it is immeasurable, assuming that that is true and flattering. True, yes, to a degree, but definitely not flattering. In fact, that is one of the big problems with archives — that their value or impact is not directly measurable. We try to measure, and, despite the strength of the adverbs we use (very, extremely, critically, etc.), the measurement is soft because it lacks numbers.

The launch will showcase some transformative uses [of the archive] that show what you can do with a massive digital library that’s been operationalized.

Dan Cohen, Executive Director of the Digital Public Library of America, using our favorite t-word to describe what’s possible with a totally digital library.

From How the Digital Public Library of America hopes to build a real public commons | The Verge 

via: arlpolicynotes